Thermal and Transport Concept Inventory Results Picture

  • TCCI Brief
  • Results 2011
  • Results 2008
  • Results 2007
  • Results 2006
  • Results 2005
  • Results 2004
  • Results 2003

Thermal and Transport Concept Inventory (TCCI) Brief

The Thermal and Transport Concept Inventory (TTCI) was developed as a collaborative effort headed by Drs. Ron Miller (Colorado School of Mines) and Ruth Streveler (Purdue University). The purpose of the TTCI is to identify important but strongly help misconceptions in the thermal and transport sciences. Misconceptions included in the instrument were identified using a Delphi process with expert faculty members. Each item in the instrument was developed as open-ended questions for which a few students responded orally or in writing – their responses were used to refine the questions and provide text for the correct answer and distractors (wrong but plausible answers focused on persistent student misconceptions).

The instrument has been pilot tested at ~10 universities with over 200 students participating so far. Initial screening of candidate items was completed using item difficulty indices (i.e. how proportion of examinees answered the item correctly) and item discrimination indices (i.e. can an item discriminate between high and low performing examinees). Validity (content and construct) has been established primarily by expert review, comparison with an extensive misconception literature in thermal and transport science topics, and think-aloud sessions with engineering students. Standard reliability measures such as Kuder-Richardson KR-20 alphas are also available for each portion of the inventory (i.e. fluids, thermodynamics, heat transfer). Generally KR-20 values of ~0.6 are seen for TTCI data sets. Although not as high as expected for traditional diagnostic instruments, our alpha values indicate that we are probing complex concepts for which significant misconceptions are present.

We continue to collect data from interested faculty and encourage you to participate with your students. The most current papers describing detailed TTCI results and analysis can be found by clicking the tabs on the top of this page.

2011 Results

Identifying And Repairing Student Misconceptions In Thermal And Transport Science: Concept Inventories And Schema Training Studies", Ronald L. Miller, Colorado School Of Mines; Ruth A. Streveler, Purdue University; Dazhi Yang, Boise State University; Aidsa I. Santiago Roman, University Of Puerto Rico At Mayagüez, Vol. 45, No. 3, Chemical Engineering Education, Summer 2011

"Rigorous Methodology for Concept Inventory Development: Using the ‘Assessment Triangle’ to Develop and Test the Thermal and Transport Science Concept Inventory (TTCI)*",
Ruth A. Streveler, Purdue University; Ronald L. Miller, Colorado School Of Mines;
Aidsa I. Santiago Roman, University Of Puerto Rico At Mayagüez; Mary A. Nelson
University Of Colorado; Monica R. Geist, Front Range Community College;
Barbara M. Olds, United States National Science Foundation, International Journal of Engineering Education Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 968–984, 2011 0949-149X/91, Printed in Great Britain

2008 Results

Developing an Instrument to Measure Engineering Students Misconceptions in Thermal and Transport Science,” R.A. Streveler, R.L. Miller, M.A. Nelson, M.R. Geist, and B.M. Olds, Journal of Engineering Education, 2008.

2007 Results

How to Create a Concept Inventory: The Thermal and Transport Concept Inventory,” M.A. Nelson, M.R. Geist, R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, and B.M. Olds, Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Chicago, Illinois, April 9-13, 2007.

Use of Concept Inventories to Identify Misconceptions in Thermal Sciences,” R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, and B.M. Olds, Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Engineering Education & Training (electronic), Kuwait City, Kuwait, April 9-11, 2007.

2006 Results

Misconceptions about Rate Processes: Preliminary Evidence for the Importance of Emergent Conceptual Schemas in Thermal and Transport Sciences,” R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, B.M. Olds, M.T.H. Chi, M.A. Nelson, and M.R. Geist, Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference (electronic), Chicago, Illinois, June 18-21, 2006 (nominated for best conference paper).

Using Concept Inventories for Formative Assessment of Conceptual Learning: A Case Study from Engineering,” MA. Nelson, R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, B.M. Olds, and M.R. Geist, Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, April 7-11, 2006.

2005 Results

"Concept Inventories Meet Cognitive Psychology: Using Beta Testing as a Mechanism for Identifying Engineering Student Misconceptions,” R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, M.A. Nelson, M.R. Geist, and B.M. Olds, Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference (electronic), Portland, Oregon, June 12-15, 2005.

"From Practice to Research: Using Professional Expertise to Inform Research about Engineering Students’ Conceptual Understanding,” M.A. Nelson, M. Geist, B.M. Olds, R.A. Streveler, R.L. Miller, R. Ammerman, and C. Ammerman, Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, April 11-15, 2005.

2004 Results

Preliminary Results from the Development of a Concept Inventory in Thermal and Transport Science,” B.M. Olds, R.A. Streveler, R.L. Miller, and M.A. Nelson, Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference (electronic), Salt Lake City, Utah, June 20-23, 2004.

2003 Results

"Using a Delphi Study to Identify the Most Difficult Concepts for Students to Master in Thermal and Transport Science,” R.A. Streveler, B.M. Olds, R.L. Miller, and M.A. Nelson, Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference (electronic), Nashville, Tennessee, June 22-25, 2003.

What Conceptual Models Do Engineering Students Use to Describe Momentum Transfer and Heat Conduction?”, R.L. Miller, R.A. Streveler, B.M. Olds, and M.A. Nelson, Proceedings of the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Chicago, Illinois, April 21-25, 2003.

Colorado School of Mines Chemistry Department